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Video Seminar Live has been a lifesaver for us. During our website development we have needed to communicate with our developers, project managers and marketing people every night.
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Video Seminar Live is easy to use and very cost effective. I was up and running in no time and I didn't even have to read a manual! The variety of features are impressive and the real
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Webinar providers

Webinar services

Webinar Services Provider Company

Webinar Services

Webinars and online seminars are fast becoming main stream tools for all types of businesses and educational uses. The efficiency and ease of use has taken a quantum leap forward in the last 6 months. As this technology continues to improve the big winner will certainly be the general public. Anyone can now use these powerful tools at a fraction of the cost compared to what they used to be. And the great thing about all this is that it really works.


by Alf Nucifora
The promise of online get-togethers has been touted from the very first days of the Internet going main stream. The truth is the technology never took off. Old habits die hard. The initial attempts at web conferencing and online collaboration ran up against the traditional new technology obstacles–not particularly user friendly and a royal pain for the busy executive who had neither the patience nor the skill to deal with a play toy of the techno geeks. Since 9/11, however, things have changed. The difficulty and rising cost inherent in today’s business travel coupled with the need to constrain expense as a result of an ever lingering recession, has forced a second look at web conferencing, not just as a means of bypassing the traditional face-to-face meeting, but also as an opportunity to train, demonstrate and inform without the loss of time and dollars associated with gathering bodies in a hotel room or meeting facility.


What’s Changed?


Improved technology, the dramatic growth in penetration of high bandwidth via cable modem and DSL connection and the rapidly declining cost of online communication have all helped make web conferencing a viable option for today’s small-to-medium sized business. Web conferencing was a half-billion dollar business in 2002 and continues to grow at an annual rate of 30+%. At a broad average price of 50-60 cents per minute, it’s now a viable alternative to the face-to-face meeting and a preferred option to the traditional teleconference where one can never see the whites of their eyes.


Web conferencing is nothing more than a productivity tool. In addition to saving money and allowing a company to use its employees’ time more effectively, it also improves communication, both internal and external. That’s why the sales and marketing people have been its most ardent supporters. They see the technology’s value for hard core selling and demoing of the product. Say’s David Thompson, Chief Marketing Officer for industry leader, WebEx Communications, “It expands a company’s business beyond geographical territory. More importantly, it’s a great tool for post-sales support, particularly for customer training.” Scott D’Entrement, President and CEO of Netspoke, supports the claim, “One of our major clients is using integrated audio and web conferencing to conduct and archive training sessions while another has realized substantial savings by using web conferencing technology to allow its IT department to conduct technical training online and to work remotely, thereby avoiding the need for increased staffing.”

 

Web conferencing and online collaboration will never replace the face-to-face meeting, but it’s an effective way to fill the gaps. Given that most of the leading providers offer tried and proven technology at equivalent price points, the prospective buyer for web conferencing services needs to pursue the fundamentals–a quality product with flawless 24/7 customer service support and so easy to use that even the harried executive can adopt the technology with a minimal learning curve and with an ease and speed that one normally associates with the ATM or e-mail.